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42% complete! Iara VPS has read 3 of 7 books.

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

Um grande trabalho jornalístico

5 stars

O livro narra como a violência foi empregada na Ásia e na América Latina (com apoio dos EUA) para exterminar comunistas reais e imaginários. Obviamente é impossível dizer como estaríamos hoje se as coisas tivessem sido diferentes, se os governos de Sukarno, Goulart, Allende e tantos outros não tivessem sido sabotados, se pessoas que sonhavam com um mundo melhor não tivessem sido condenadas e mortas por esse crime. Mas esse livro me fez pensar nos futuros que nos foram negados...

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

Um grande trabalho jornalístico que narra como a violência foi empregada na Ásia e na América Latina (com apoio dos EUA) para exterminar comunistas reais e imaginários. Quantos futuros nos foram negados?

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

[...] the major losers of the twentieth century were those who believed too sincerely in the existence of a liberal international order, those who trusted too much in democracy, or too much in what the United States said it supported, rather than what it really supported — what the rich countries said, rather than what they did. That group was annihilated.

The Jakarta Method by  (Page 243)

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

In this book, I spent less time discussing the real atrocities carried out by certain communist regimes in the twentieth century. That's partly because they're so well known already; it's mostly because these crimes truly didn't have much to do with the stories of the men and women whose lives we traced throughout the past one hundred years. But it's also because we do not live in a world directly constructed by Stalin's purges or mass starvation under Pol Pot. Those states are gone. Even Mao's Great Leap Forward was quickly abandoned and rejected by the Chinese Communist Party, though the party is still very much around. We do, however, live in a world built partly by US-backed Cold War violence.

The Jakarta Method by  (Page 240)

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

There are heated debates as to whether China has grown because it embraced capitalism or because it had Communist reforms and still remains under the control of a technocratic single party. But what is clear is that China is absolutely not an anticommunist regime created by US intervention in the Cold War

The Jakarta Method by  (Page 235)

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

Even in the face of overwhelming evidence that mass murder is occurring, the human instinct is to hold out hope that your son, or your daughter, might be saved. This freezes people, and makes populations much more quiescent — easier to exterminate and easier to control.

The Jakarta Method by  (Page 145)

Vincent Bevins: The Jakarta Method (Paperback, 2021, PublicAffairs) 5 stars

In 1965, the U.S. government helped the Indonesian military kill approximately one million innocent civilians. …

He recounts that locals came to him, time and time again, and asked, with genuine mystification: 'We just don't understand America. You were once a colony. You know what colonialism is. You fought and bled and died for your freedom. How can you possibly support the status quo?'

The Jakarta Method by  (Page 74 - 75)